Today on Studio 5, I’m sharing easy ideas for making your own travelers notebook. I also share my favorite store-bought options (Hello, Freckled Fawn!) and insert choices in case you love the idea but don’t want to invest in the DIY aspect. Either way, I hope you’ll tune in at 11 a.m. (online and on TV [channel 5]) to learn more about these sweet creative journals/scrapbooks/sketchbooks/happiness!

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Thanks for having me, Studio 5. Love you guys!

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BE THE FIRST TO KNOW ABOUT UPCOMING CLASSES (including my DIY TN classes!)

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I love getting out in the SLC and sharing some creativity with friends. I have some great classes in the works that will be happening soon, including classes on DIY travelers notebooks (creative journals and faux leather journal covers).

Be the First to Know

Simply email me at meghoeppner@gmail.com. Nothing fancy required—you can just say add me to your class list in the subject line and I’ll do it to it.

I know you’re busy and the last thing you want is another bunch of spam filling your inbox.I assure you, that won’t be the case. In fact, I’ve been building a list for years and have yet to send a single email (#epicbusinessfail), but I intend to change that and be better about sharing my classes. I’m asked about them often and don’t do enough to get the word out. So this is my public statement to be held accountable and take the next step. :) Thanks so much for your support and interest in what I love and do!

See you at 11. Cheers!

DIY Traveler's Notebook and Inserts

Hello! Thanks for makng this a stop on your web travels today. (See what I did there? ;) ) Let’s take a look at my latest paper obsession: DIY travler’s notebook covers.

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I created this project for Echo Park Paper Co., using the very delightful new Summer Adventure collection.

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You can read more about my process and tips for this project on the Echo Park blog.

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You can also see a video of the action right here OR on my YouTube channel.

I was inspired to create this project by this video on YouTube by LiveLoveScrap.

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DIY NOTEBOOK COVER

Step 1: Cut a piece of patterned paper to 9”x8.5” and gently fold that sheet in half (no hard creasing) so it measures 4.5”x8.5”. Open the paper back up so it's flat but with the center lightly creased/identified by your fold.

Step 2 (optional): Die cut words from your cover. (I used the Explore Outdoors Die Set by Echo Park Paper Co. to cut my outdoor phrases.)

Step 3: Pierce holes along your center fold, approximately 1/4” down from the top of the page and 1/4” up from the bottom, followed by two holes on either side of each of these holes, 1/4” over. Finally, pierce one hole approximately in the middle of the center fold line. (This should leave you with seven pierced holes (three on the top, three on the bottom, and one in the middle..)

Step 4: Score lines running parallel to your center fold, connecting your pierced holes. Fold your paper along those lines to give you your notebook shape.

Step 5: Flatten the cover back out and place it in a laminating sheet; laminate. "
NOTE: If you do not have a laminater, you can use self-laminating pouches for this step.

Step 6: Trim away any excess laminating film, re-fold your book along the scored lines to give you your cover shape, and re-pierce your holes.

Step 7: Thread elastic cording following the steps below.
NOTE: It helps to have a needle with a large eye for this, as elastic cording can be tricky to thread.



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A. Starting on the lower right hole, coming from the front of the cover inside, thread elastic cording, leaving approximately 6” of a tail.
NOTE: Pull your cording fairly tight, leaving only enough room to tuck a notebook insert between it and your notebook cover.

B. Thread your cording through the hole directly above the hole you just threaded. (This should have your needle now back on the outside of your cover.)

C. Thread your cording through the center hole, just to the left of the hole you came out of. Thread your needle through the center hole on the bottom of the cover. (Your needle should now, again, be on the outside of your book.)

D. Thread back in, this time using the far left hole on the bottom, followed by the far left on the top. (You should now have three bands of elastic cording running along the inside spine of your notebook cover.)

E. Your needle should now be on the outside of your notebook, at the top. Thread it back through the top, center hole. Leave approximately a 6” tail and trim the rest of your cording away from the packaging. Remove your needle.

F. Thread your first 6” tail through the needle and bring that piece of cording back through the bottom center hole. You should now have two 6” pieces of cording on the inside of your notebook cover. Meet them in the middle, tie them in a double knot, and trim away any excess. This will leave you with a total of four elastic bands running along the inside of your notebook spine.

G. Trim a new piece of elastic cording that is long enough to wrap around the center of your book one and a half times. Fold that piece in half, thread the folded side through your needle, and thread that needle through the center hole of your notebook, coming from the inside of the cover out.
NOTE: Be careful not to pull the cording all the way through the hole.

H. Leave just enough cording to wrap around your notebook as a closure, and tie a double knot to prevent the rest of the cording from pulling through the hole. Trim away any excess cording. This will leave you with a center elastic closure that will hold your notebook shut.

With your notebook cover made, you can now add DIY paper inserts.

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DIY NOTEBOOK INSERTS

Creating DIY notebooks to go inside your traveler’s notebook cover is easy and fun. Simply follow these quick steps:

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Step 1: Bundle several sheets of patterned paper and fold them in half, making sure they’re cut to measure smaller than your notebook cover when folded.

Step 2: Keep your folded sheets bundled together and pierce three holes along the center fold.

Step 3: Thread a needle with baker’s twine or embroidery floss (roughly 48” in length); thread your needle through the center hole, going from the inside of the paper bundle, out.
NOTE: Leave a tail (approximately 4”) here.

Step 4: Thread your needle through the bottom hole, coming from the outside of the bundle in. Thread back through the center hole again, going from the inside out. Thread through the top hole (outside, in). Your needle should now, again, be on the inside of your paper bundle.

Step 5: Thread your needle under the lower binding loop that’s in place and tie then tie what’s left of your thread to the original 4” tail you left in place. Tie using a double knot. Trim away any excess twin you have. Your book should now be completely bound.

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Don’t let my lengthy list of steps fool you. These techniques really are easy to do. I just wanted to break it down to make it easier to follow for those of you reading the instructions to complete your project (vs. watching the videos). I hope I haven’t left you confused at any point in the process. If so, leave me a comment or send me an email, and I will happily answer any questions you have.

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I can say from my own experience and that of students I’ve taught this to—once you create these, you won’t want to stop. You’ll find yourself making books for your family and friends, too. It’s such a happy process and end results. I hope you enjoy this technique and idea.

Happy travels!









Printer Review: Which Photo Printer Is Right For You? (Plus, WIN a Canon!)

If there’s one thing I’m super passionate about, it’s printing your photos. Well… It’s near the top of my list! It’s why I taught my online course, From App to Archive, on CreativeLive (on sale right now for just $34! Woot!). Worse than the shoeboxes of yesteryear, images today are getting lost in cloudy devices and on social sites that don’t even belong to us. It’s tragic when you think about it. And it’s why I’m all for you investing in a home photo printer. It doesn’t have to be anything big and fancy. In fact, some of my favorite personal printers are bitty. And so cute! LOL

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Not sure what to buy? I’m sharing a roundup today on my favorite TV show, Studio 5. You’ll find more details on each listed here. Take a look at their bells and whistles and decide which one is your perfect printer in crime.

PRINTER #1: The Epson PictureMate-400

WHY I LOVE IT: While this printer isn't technically a portable printer, it can easily be transported. It folds up nice and compact, is light weight, and works wirelessly with a wifi connection. Ink and photo paper are affordable, and the ink lasts a long time. 




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Specifics

  • Price: $200

  • Best print quality of the options I have.

  • Prints 4x6 and 5x7 images. 

  • Requires ink refills. An ink cartridge costs around $30 and includes all colors, including black, in a single cartridge.

  • Works best with Epson photo paper. A pack of 100 sheets can be as low as $5 on amazon. 

  • Works wirelessly or with a connection. You can also insert a memory card directly in the printer.

  • Can print directly from a smart device if both it and the device are connected to WiFi.

PRINTER #2: Fuji Instax Share

WHY I LOVE IT: This printer is my buddy. I've had it for YEARS (since 2010) and it's still going strong. I love its retro vibe and portable element. 

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Specifics

  • Price: $99-$140 (depending on package)

  • Prints on Polaroid-inspired film--shake it like a Polaroid picture! ;) 

  • Prints are washed out. Tip: Print darker images than you normally would.

  • Newer model available. Print quality improved with the newer model, so don't be fooled by my oldie-but-goodie.

  • Works on batteries or you can plug it in. Batteries are those short, fat, pricey fellas, so a plug-in is a cost-effective way to go.

  • Requires no ink. Ink is in the film.

  • Film averages about $0.50-$1 per print.

  • Uses the same film as the well-known Instax Mini cameras. 

  • Can buy white film or go with fun, colorful and patterned options. (speciality options tend to cost a bit more.)

  • Fun to craft with because the print has the border at the base, which is great for stamping or adding washi tape to.

  • To connect to your phone and print, the Instax will establish its own wifi connection, which you'll want to select in the settings on your device before printing. 

  • Works with a free app that you add to your device. 

  • App includes limited editing capability, including cropping and filters. 

PRINTER #3: Canon Ivy

WHY I LOVE IT: This is the newest printer to join my family. She's also the smallest/lightest weight. I love that this one comes in pink and teal options. I'm also a fan of the film, which is both a picture and a sticker!

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Specifics

  • Price: Starts at $99

  • Uses ZINC (zero-ink) technology, meaning you don't have to buy ink refills. Instead, the ink is in the film.

  • Film averages $25 for 50 sheets. 

  • Film has a peel-and-stick back, giving you instant stickers (should you want them). 

  • Doesn't print true to color, but the prints aren't bad quality.

  • Works with a free app that you add to your device. 

  • App includes limited editing capability, including cropping, frames, stickers, and filters. 

  • Prints by establishing a bluetooth connection, so you'll want to make sure your bluetooth is enabled.

  • Works via a plug or its rechargeable battery. Note: The battery doesn't hold its charge very long, so you’ll want to keep the charger near. 

  • You can buy a carrying case for it and the film, which is a nice extra for crafting on the go. 

PRINTER #4: The LifePrint

WHY I LOVE IT: It’s like a magic trick! You print a pic with it and then hold your phone over the printed image using your smart device and the LifePrint app. Abbra cadabra! It shows you a movie of what was happening when the pic was taken. VERY COOL!

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SPECIFICS

  • Uses the same ZINC photo paper you use with the Ivy.

  • Photos must be shot in LIVE mode to get the video component.

    GIVEAWAY TIME!!

Great news! I have a Canon Ivy to give away to one lucky person!! Check my instagram account for details and your chance to win. Contest closes at 8:00 AM MST on Monday, February 4, 2019.

Good luck!